Naval Intel Week – CIMSEC

By Dmitry Filipoff This week CIMSEC will be featuring articles submitted in response to our call for articles on the future of naval intelligence. Naval intelligence is only growing in its usefulness and criticality.

Whether it be tactical intelligence that could unleash heavy accurate fires, or more strategic intelligence that perceives a competitor’s naval warfighting strategy, naval intelligence should form a bedrock for force development and forward operations. The maritime operating environment and the forces operating within them are growing in complexity and sophistication, demanding robust and well-integrated naval intelligence that is carefully heeded by leaders across echelons. How can naval intelligence be adapted to meet the challenges of today’s environment?

Below are the articles and authors being featured, which will be updated with further submissions as Naval Intelligence Week unfolds. Brains and Brown Shoes: Building a Better Naval Aviation Intelligence Officer,” by Lieutenant Peter McGee, Lieutenant Gretchen Arndt, and Commander Christopher Nelson
“Intel Owns Red: How Red Teaming Can Prepare the Fleet for the Fight Ahead,” by Lieutenant Commander Christopher Blake and Lieutenant Grace Jones
“The Coastwatchers: Intelligence Lessons Learned for the Future Single Naval Battle,” by Captain Michael Van Liew
“Calling in Thunder: Naval Intelligence Enabling Precision Long-Range Fires,” by Lieutenant Commander Gerie Palanca
“Trustable AI: A Critical Challenge for Naval Intelligence,” by Stephen L. Dorton and Samantha Harper
“The Unique Intelligence Challenges of Countering Naval Asymmetric Warfare,” by CDR (ret.) Dr.

Eyal Pinko
Dmitry Filipoff is CIMSE’s Director of Online Content. Contact him at Content@cimsec.org.

Featured Image:  The Arabian Gulf (Mar.

23, 2003) — The Tactical Operations Officer (TAO), along with Operations Specialists, stand watch in the Combat Direction Center (CDC) aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) monitoring all surface and aerial contacts in the operating area. (U.S.

Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate Airman Tiffany A.

Aiken.)

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